Sunday, 10 July 2016

Zootropolis/Zootopia



When Judy Hopps (Ginnifer Goodwin) becomes the first rabbit to join the police force, she quickly learns how tough it is to enforce the law as she is disrespected because of her size and stature. Determined to prove herself, Judy jumps at the opportunity to solve a mysterious case that no cop in Metropolis seems to want to solve. Unfortunately, that means working with Nick Wilde (Nick Bateman), a sly fox whose reputation for cunning and sneakiness is well deserved

One of the more difficult challenges when making films like Zootopia is getting them to appeal to both adults and children. Pixar, more often than not has achieved with flying colours, Disney on the other hand were slightly less successful. However, in Disney’s latest offering the hallmarks are clearly evident for a film that appeals to many.

Much like The Lego Movie the major city in Zootropolis/Zootopia (the title is different in Europe for reasons unexplained by Disney) is bursting with imagination, colour and life, seamlessly dragging the viewer into a gigantic city that covers many different ecosystems and environments. In fact Judy Hopps’ first trip into the city is one of the best moments in the film as the animation is spellbinding.
 
That said with a budget of $150,000,000 animation that isn’t extraordinary would be a massive disappointment, it’s much harder to create an engaging storyline and characters but this is something writers Jared Bush and Phil Johnson achieved remarkably well. Judy Hopps' naïve bunny makes for a likeable character, and her relationship with Nick the cunning fox is engaging, but it’s perhaps the sloths who all steal the show and look set to provide Disney with another truck of money from sold merchandise.  

The film’s themes of sexism in the workplace and racism and paranoia in society adds a level of depth to the story, plus the fish out of water (fish and other sea life did not seem to be included in this utopian world where prey and predators live in harmony) story where a bunny tries to become the first bunny police officer is a charming one. The visuals are eye popping and dazzling, but the engaging story, witty writing and delightful sight gags is what really makes the film a joy.

4.5/5

2 comments:

  1. Yeah this one really surprised me. The trailer featuring the DMV scene was hilarious (and was still hilarious when you see it in the film). But the movie has so much heart in it and such appealing characters. I gave this film a rewatch last week and still had a great time. I also have to say Michael Giacchino's score has some really fun moments that add so much to the film. Great review!

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  2. Great review. Loved the characters, animation, and the important themes presented in this movie.

    - Zach

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